FIA WEC

  • Rebellion and Toyota share the spoils in opening Silverstone WEC practice

    In a sign of the heightened competition in the FIA World Endurance Championship, Toyota Gazoo Racing shared the top of the timesheets with Rebellion Racing as practice got underway for the opening round of the 2019/20 season.

    With the Silverstone Circuit completely resurfaced since the series last took on the historic track, practice lap records fell from the off as Toyota appeared to carry on where it left off in the Super Season as it appeared to be on course to lock out the top two places in LMP1 in the first 90-minute session. However, Norman Nato’s 34th lap - of 37 - was enough to spring a surprise as the #1 Rebellion R13 jumped 0.420sec clear of Brendon Hartley’s best lap in the #8 TS050 Hybrid. The #7 was a tenth further back, with the second Rebellion within a second of the leader. The privateer squad couldn’t repeat that effort in Free Practice Two as the two Toyotas locked out the top spots - the #7 leading the #8, with the #1 Rebellion heading the #3.

    Both the Ginettas propped up the LMP1 class in each session, but not through a complete lack of speed. After struggling with gear selection issues in the first practice, the #5 Team LNT car bounced back to be within a second of the fourth-placed Rebellion - the #6 not too far behind having been fifth in FP1.

    In LMP2, United Autosports proved the team didn’t need much time to adapt from its former Ligier to its new Oreca 07 as the crew of Phil Hanson, Filipe Albuquerque and Paul Di Resta topped both practices.They had a comfortable 0.4sec lead over Cool Racing in FP1, but was ran a lot closer in the second session as Di Resta finished just two-hundredths of a second clear of Kenta Yamashita in the High Class Racing Oreca. Another team making a good job of switching to a new chassis was Racing Team Nederland. The squad, switching from Dallara to Oreca.

    Le Mans winners AF Corse, and WEC GTE Pro champions Porsche shared first place in the lead GT class. In session one, the Porsche 911 RSR of Gianmaria Bruni and Richard Lietz topped the Ferrari 488 GTE Evo of James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi before the positions were reversed in the late afternoon practice. In FP1, Aston Martin secured third and fourth - the Dane train of Marco Sorensen and Nicki Thiim beating out Alex Lynn and Maxime Martin. The #71 AF Corse Ferrari and the #92 Porsche GT Team 911 rounded out the shrunken-down class. That was shaken up in the second practice as the #71 of Miguel Molina and Davide Rigon leaped up to third with the #92 of Michael Christensen and Kevin Estre 0.029sec behind in fourth. Thiim and Sorensen were 0.040sec behind in fifth with Lynn and Martin in sixth.

    Compared to GTE Pro, Aston Martin Vantages were the cars to beat in GTE Am. The factory car of Darren Turner, Ross Gunn and Paul Dalla Lana combined with the TF Sport entry of Salih Yoluc, Jonny Adam and Charlie Eastwood locked out the top two places in both practices. In FP1 the TF Sport led the way by 0.579sec before Turner hit back in FP2 to squeak ahead by 0.096sec in a good day for the manufacturer at its home race. Both sessions had the final place in the top three filled by a Ferrari, FP1 honours went to MR Racing, before AF Corse snatched the place away in the second. Keeping the Italian entries honest was the #56 Team Project 1 Porsche 911 which finished fourth on both occassions.

  • "I know I want to race" - Anthony Davidson

    Anthony Davidson is a frustrated man at Le Mans this year. The Briton has been an integral part of Toyota's Le Mans campaign in recent years and is widely considered to be one of the finest sports car racers in the world. Nevertheless, this year he finds himself on the sidelines, having been forced to make way for Formula 1 superstar Fernando Alonso, who has taken his seat in the #8 TS050 HYBRID. Speed Chills caught up with Davidson at the circuit on Wednesday to hear how he feels about the situation.

    "I know that I want to race, and I know that when I drove the laps here in practice a couple of weeks ago, I clicked straight back into it. I was quick and sat top of the time sheets for 20 or 30 minutes. It all just felt natural.

    Short Image Description

    "I’ve done a lot of miles in the car already this year. I took the new lap record at Aragon during winter testing, so I am still fast and still committed to the team, but I now find myself in this situation. It is a bit strange, however, it is not the first time in my career that I’ve been a reserve driver. It is however, strange finding myself here as a reserve driver, especially as I know this place so well. I’ve done 10 Le Mans. I should have won it at least once or twice, so it feels strange to not have the chance to win this time round. But, a lot can happen in sports cars. I might be back with the team, you never know. It’s a long way to go.

    "It was completely the team’s decision to move me in to the reserve driver role. It was not my decision not to race. I was told it was me that had to step aside for Fernando, so I have to respect the team. It is a shame, however – that’s the way motorsport is sometimes. It was a tough decision for the team, all six drivers were performing well so it was never going to be an easy decision to move one of their top driver’s asides. It’s a strange situation, I won five races last year in 2017. But basically, Fernando had to be here, and he had to take one of our drives. It’s as simple as that. Its unlucky that it was me but that’s just life. If you were going to step aside for anyone in the world, then Fernando is not a bad driver to step aside for so that makes it a bit easier. If it was Joe Bloggs, then I would be annoyed. It is like the world wants Fernando to win Le Mans this year. He’s on a quest for the triple crown and he finds himself here with the team. Fernando had limited options once Audi and Porsche both dropped out of the series so there was only one team to go for and it was this team. This is his best opportunity to win Le Mans.

    "I know I was performing at my best and I am proud of what I achieved last year. As I said, I won five races and in particular, the last two were very good for me. I couldn’t have given any more. My family are happy to see a bit more of me now and my wife is happy that I am not out on track risking my life. Obviously, Le Mans is not the safest race in the world. It is dangerous. I’ve ended up in hospital over the years. I broke my back in 2012. Le Mans is dangerous, and it can bite you. It’s probably the most challenging circuit we go to in terms of safety and the drivers respect that.

    "We have put a lot of work into testing and development over the winter. It is essentially the same car as last year but with a few small developments. Primarily, we have improved the usability for the drivers and the engineers. We have tested numerous scenarios and if anything goes wrong, we can get the car home. Winter testing has been hard work, it has been quite involved and it is the work that no one gets to see. That is the time when we, as drivers, really make our money. It’s bloody hard work. We do long tests, 36-hour sessions with five or six drivers and we don’t stop. That’s the stuff under the radar.

    "We’ve been testing at Portimao and Aragon primarily and the car has been performing really well, as it was last year. It’s the same package but it is nicer and easier to drive. We have been focusing on all the possibilities that could go wrong. We have been approaching it like Nasa would approach a space mission, looking at anything that could possibly go wrong, and we have developed a backup plan for each situation.

    "We have learnt a lot about the car, we know it inside out like never before. We have been given manuals on the steering system, the switches, the controls. We have learnt how to repair the car with the onboard kit we carry. We are completely ready to make sure that we are on top of any possible situation that could go wrong. Of course, there are things outside of our control, force majeure and all that and with this race, there is always a chance of that. But that said, we are in a much better place as a whole team than ever before.

    "Everything that you could think of that could possibly go wrong, we have tried our best to replicate in testing and simulation work to prepare for it. It has been quite good fun actually in many ways. Only a select few people within the team know what’s going to happen. The drivers and mechanics were not aware, and scenarios would be thrown in as a surprise to see how people would react and perform. You could never relax, you always had to have your wits about you and be focused. The issues were rarely announced and there were of course times when the team and drivers got it wrong and would have ended up in a situation where the car could not be recovered. We learnt the hard way and that’s the best way to learn. It has been absolutely fascinating as a driver to experience. I had some input into it all and fell down a few times!

    "What’s the saying team Sky use? Train hard, race easy. It takes time to learn and defeat only makes you stronger. By going through that defeat, we have realised how hard things are and how to recover from a situation. If you turned up and just won by luck and you don’t know how you win then that is sometimes more dangerous as you are unprepared for the event. In terms of development, we don’t necessarily need to make the car quicker. We know it has the pace to win, the main focus has been on reliability and understanding the trials and tribulations of Le Mans. All those defeats the team have suffered, they have been pretty cruel over the years, but it makes you stronger.

    "If we were to have the 2016 situation right now, in exactly the same way, we would have still won the race. Everyone would be able to recover it. And what happened to Nico last year, we would be able to recover that now. We would have got back to the pits. We are now set to make sure that we can get the car home. It’s that never give up attitude and you don’t see it in any other racing, certainly anything I’ve done and its incredible to see that if those two situations happen now then it is fully recoverable.

    "It’s a shame for me not to be out there, I feel readier than ever. Even if we had Porsche and Audi here now or any other quality brands, I feel that we are in the best position to win. I am here as a reserve driver, that’s it. I’m not going to polish it up, I am here as the back-up in case something goes wrong with one of the other drivers. I wouldn’t want any other roles or responsibilities. We’ve got Alex Wurz to be the team advisor/ambassador. I’m here to just hang around in case anything goes wrong. It may be my easiest Le Mans ever, you never know!

    "There was never an option to run a third car this year. I don’t know the exact reason, but you would say, if there was ever a year to run 3/4/5/6 cars, it would be this year, but it was never an option. You will have to ask some other people to get an answer for that question, it sure would have helped me if there was a third car.

    "All the other teams, with the exception of ByKolles are new. We are such a well-polished team now. We have learnt from our bad experiences and it has put us into this situation we are in today. I’m not saying that nothing will go wrong because you can never predict that. We are however in the best situation we could possibly be. We cannot prepare for a sudden downpour at one corner when you’re on slicks, or someone’s engine blowing and dropping oil all over the track and you go flying off into the barrier. You cannot foresee things like that, but we are trained as drivers in this team to report any oil or a slippery surface on track, we report that back to the team who will pass that on.

    "We have done some work on the clutch as well, we have burnt it to a crisp in testing and it is bullet proof. So, if some guy jumps out in front of us in the pitlane pretending to be a marshal, we can recover from that and it won’t be a problem.

    "I think the best and worst memories are from 2016, I drove my best Le Mans I ever have. Bringing the car back to the front and leading the race. You know when you have driven 100% and in terms of personal satisfaction, it was my best race. And I had that feeling of winning Le Mans, I could taste it. I was just waiting for Kazuki to pass the line before it was taken away. But that feeling, I would take physical pain over that any day."

  • #7 Toyota Disqualified from qualifying

    #7 Toyota disqualified from qualifying after failing to disclose the correct technical information.

    Short Image Description

    In a late turn of events last night, long after qualifying had finished, the #7 Toyota was called in front of the Stewards. Toyota had incorrectly declared the fuel flow meter. As a result of this, the qualifying times set by the #7 have been cancelled, promoting the #8 car of Fernando Alonso, Kazuki Nakajima and Sebastien Buemi to the front of the grid. The #7 “will start from the pit lane, and shall not join the race until the last car in the field has covered his first lap and following Race Director Instruction.”

    Neel Jani, Andre Lotterer and Bruno Senna will now start alongside the #8 Toyota on the front row.

    Following the decision, Toyota Gazoo Racing released a statement: “The team accepts full responsibility for the error, which had no impact whatsoever on car performance. The fuel flow meter which was used in the #7 was fully homologated and calibrated. Team processes and procedures will be strengthened immediately to avoid any repeat of this unfortunate error”

  • #7 Toyota ends the first day of Le Mans running on top despite crash

    The #7 Toyota Gazoo Racing TS050 Hybrid of Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and Jose Maria Lopez finished the first full day of running at the Le Mans 24 Hours on the top of the times, but lost a chunk of time after crashing into an LMP2 Oreca.

    Having also led the four-hour free practice session held under mixed conditions on Wednesday afternoon, Lopez struck early in the night-time Qualifying One session to set the provisional pole-time of 3m17.161. The #7’s programme was curtailed though as it was caught out by Roberto Gonzalez in the LMP2 pace-setting DragonSpeed Oreca. Gonzalez was recovering from a spin at the Ford Chicane and pulled back on track in front of Conway, causing the Brit to smash into the nose of the LMP2. After rapid repair work, both cars managed to get back out on track – the DragonSpeed got out with 25 minutes still to run while the Toyota completed the final 16 minutes. Despite the incident, the #7 Toyota’s time beat the closest of the LMP1 privateers – the #17 SMP Racing BR1 – by half-a-second. That doesn’t tell the full story though, as the sister #11 had set the fastest time for the bulk of practice thanks to Stoffel Vandoorne, until Kobayashi’s penultimate lap put Toyota back on top by almost two seconds.

    The #11 couldn’t match the same pace in the darkness, finishing P7 – behind the two eye-catchingly liveried Rebellion R13s which have both been in the top five mix throughout the day – the fastest of the Swiss cars beating the #8 Toyota of Kazuki Nakajima, Fernando Alonso and Sebastien Buemi in both sessions. The car finished fourth in both sessions after a tricky day for that entry.

    Propping up the lead prototype class in both sessions was the ByKolles Enso CLM P1/01 of Paolo Ruberti, Tom Dillmann and Oli Webb.

    LMP2 went the way of DragonSpeed - Pastor Maldonado’s 3m26.804 early in the session enough to keep the Signatech Alpine A470 in second by 0.131s. United Autosports claimed third at the end of day one, four-tenths behind the Alpine but half-a-second ahead of practice pace-setters IDEC Sport in a category that is shaping up to be anyone’s game come race day, with G-Drive Racing’s Aurus 01 performing strongly in the earlier session.

    GTE Pro provisional pole is currently in the hands of Harry Tincknell in the #67 Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK Ford GT. The Brit set his lap in the dying moments of qualifying, finishing 0.028s ahead of Nick Tandy in the #93 Porsche GT Team Porsche 911 RSR ran by the CORE Autosport team.

    Third went to the #97 Aston Martin Racing Vantage of Alex Lynn, Jonny Adam and Maxime Martin, with the additional three Porsche GT Team entries in fourth, fifth and sixth.

    The #77 Dempsey Proton Porsche set the bar in Free Practice 1 with a time of 3:55.304 with the #54 Ferrari and #98 Aston Martin less than half a second behind. The #88 Dempsey Proton Porsche of Satoshi Hoshino caused a Fully Course Yellow after the car went off at Porsche Curves, through the gravel and into the wall. Around 45 minutes of the session was red flagged following an incident involving Tracy Krohn, the #99 Dempsey-Proton Porsche appeared to have bounced off the crash barrier several times on the approach to the second chicane. With a lack of cameras on that part of the track, it was not exactly clear what had happened but its believed that the Am driver was clipped by a faster LMP2 car. The crash damaged the chassis and whilst Porsche confirm there is a backup chassis available at Le Mans, it is unclear whether the team will use it at this stage.

    In the first of the night sessions, it was the #88 Porsche that took provisional pole position with Matteo Cairoli's best time of 3:52.454. The #56 Project 1 Porsche finished second three tenths down whilst the #77 Dempsey-Proton Porsche took third place.

  • #7 Toyota stripped of pole position

    Pit lane speed penalty denies Toyota a 1-2 start

    The #7 Toyota Gazoo Racing TS050 of Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and Jose Maria Lopez will start the Six Hours of Fuji at the back of the LMP1 field after being stripped of pole position. The entry, which had initially benefitted from Sebastien Buemi’s fastest lap in the #8 being deleted for a track limits violation, was itself stripped of its times because Lopez was adjudged to have been too fast going into pit entry. The penalty means the #8 – driven by Buemi, Fernando Alonso and Kazuki Nakajima - has secured its third pole position of the season and will start on the front-row alongside the #1 Rebellion Racing R13-AER.

    Toyota explained that the Argentinian hadn’t engaged the pit speed limiter before the pit lane entrance, meaning he was 8.7km/h too fast entering the pits.

    “It happened and from my side I have learned from this and will avoid a similar situation in the future. My biggest mistake is not reporting the issue because I had a little doubt. I didn't know it could affect my lap time, which had been completely legal. If I had known that I would have reported it and for sure we would have done another lap but I will learn from this. It's a pity but there is still a long race ahead of us,” Lopez added.

  • #7 Toyota takes first victory in Europe in dominant 1-2

    Mike Conway, Jose Maria Lopez and Kamui Kobayashi took their first European victory for Toyota Gazoo Racing as they headed a 1-2 in the opening FIA World Endurance Championship round of the year at the 4 Hours of Silverstone.

    At the start, the two Hybrid machines powered away from the field with Sébastien Buemi leaping ahead of Conway on the run into Abbey for the first time with the two Rebellion cars unable to keep up with the Toyota TS050s. The Japanese squad didn’t get chance to make much of a gap though, as the safety car was called for on just the second lap as Paul Di Resta ground to halt on the pit straight in the United Autosports Oreca 07.

    As the race went green again, disaster struck the #6 Team LNT Ginetta G60 as Charlie Robertson found himself driving a three-wheeler as the right-rear Michelin broke away from the car coming through Woodcote. He managed to limp the car back to the pits, but a puncture just ten minutes later lost more time for the British manufacturer. In another accident beyond the team’s control, the #6 was clipped by Miguel Molina’s AF Corse Ferrari heading into Maggotts, causing the prototype to go off-track and lose time. The Ferrari 488 GTE Evo was forced to retire as Molina spun into the armco at Becketts. At the front of the field, Toyota’s comfortable 1-2 was assisted for incidents and penalties befalling both the Rebellion Racing R13s. When the heavy rain shower struck just after 90 minutes completed, the #1 car hit the fuel rig as it slipped into the concrete-surfaced pit box on slick tyres. That cost it time as the team was forced to jack the car up to spin it into the right position. The #3 lost time to the leaders as it was slapped with a five-second stop-go penalty for a technical infringement. While they lost a chunk of time to the Toyotas, they still finished on the last step of the podium.

    Ahead of them, the lead battle between the Toyotas played out in the pits. Just before the halfway mark, both TS050s pitted at the same time to swap their wets for slicks with the #7 enjoying the quicker pitstop as the #8 had to be slightly repositioned once it came in. Despite Kazuki Nakajima closing in during the final 20 minutes, Lopez had enough time in hand to hold on to take the first win of the 2019/20 season. The #1 Rebellion lost time late on, with the car pushed into the garage for an inspection with less than ten minutes remaining, dropping it to fifth in class. That promoted the #5 Ginetta into fourth.

    In LMP2, an outstanding move going into Maggotts decided the class battle in Cool Racing’s favour as Nicolas Lapierre swept round Job van Uitert’s long-time leading Racing Team Nederland Oreca with an hour remaining to take victory on the team’s WEC debut. The race was playing out very much in the Dutch team’s favour before then, as Giedo van der Garde moved up to fifth overall at the start - passing both the Ginettas - and proceeded to hold onto the position throughout the numerous pitstops when the heavy rain came. However, after Lapierre’s decisive move on Uitert, the Nederland crew couldn’t offer any response as the Frenchman powered off down the road. The Dutch team was also relegated from second on the final lap as Frits Van Eerd’s valiant defence was unpicked by Signatech Alpine’s Thomas Laurent.

    The Frenchman was all over the back of Van Eerd at the start of the lap and finally made the move stick as they went down the Wellington Straight. Cool Racing’s victory was made more remarkable by the fact that the team was unexpectedly without their third driver Alexandre Coigny who was involved in a big crash in Saturday’s ELMS race. That meant Lapierre and Antonin Borga shared the driving, becoming the first two-driver crew to win in the LMP2 class since 2012 with Borga also taking victory in first WEC event. Fourth in LMP2, with a full complement of drivers, was the Jackie Chan DC Racing Oreca. Will Stevens was at the helm for a strong charge going into the final hour, but he couldn’t make up the gap quickly enough to challenge for a podium. The same could be said for the Jota team that finished fifth, less than half-a-second behind the Jackie Chan entry as Antonio Felix Da Costa powered his way up through the field but needed one more lap to pass Stevens.

    In qualifying, AF Corse was the team to beat in GTE Pro, whereas Porsche was left to contemplate what might have been. By the end of the four hours, it was a complete reversal as the Ferrari squad’s challenge fizzled out and the Manthey-run Porsche 911 RSRs powered to the top. As well as Molina’s crash in the #51, the sister #71 struggled almost from the word go as the team lost a huge chunk of time in the opening 30 minutes after James Calado was forced to pit his 488 with a puncture. That, combined with the time it took the Brit to limp the car back to the pits, dropped them well down the order finishing in fourth - the last of the classified runners. Capitalising on that was both the #91 and the #92 as a clean run and near-perfect pit strategy pushed them both up the order. It was the former that took victory as Richard Lietz and Gianmaria Bruni put their disrupted qualifying behind them - after Bruni lost time with a puncture - to hold off a late charge from Kevin Estre and Michael Christensen. Estre and Christensen’s rise up the field was a testament to their clockwork-like work throughout the race as they perfected their pitstops and then cranked out quick lap after quick lap. Claiming the final spot on the podium - despite frantic work on the grid with mechanics scouring the engine bay of the Vantage GTE - was the #97 Aston Martin Racing entry of Alex Lynn and Maxime Martin. Starting third, the pair battled through the rain and avoided the mishaps that befell their rivals to take a hard-fought third place.

    Francois Perrodo claimed a first win in three years, Emmanuel Collard a win in his first race full stop in two years, and Nicklas Nielsen took his first WEC victory as they provided AF Corse with something of a silver lining as they swept to GTE Am glory. Much like Porsche’s success in the sister Pro class, a lot of the trio’s victory was owed to sensible, smart driving with pit strategy also being spot on for the Ferrari team. Their push to the top was helped by a remarkable move from Nielsen. He swept around the outside of Ben Barker’s Gulf Racing Porsche at Stowe in the final hour as he powered up into the lead. Second went to the Aston Martin Racing team of Paul Dalla Lana, Darren Turner and Ross Gunn despite a number of dramas for the new line-up in the #98. Just before the halfway mark, Turner appeared to struggle to get out of the pits with the car reluctant to pull away. While it didn’t lose the team a huge chunk of time, it stopped them from being able to close the gap to AF Corse - even with Gunn’s rapid stint in the final hour.

    Third went the way of another Ferrari, the #70 MR Racing car of Motoaki Ishikawa, Olivier Beretta and Kei Cozzolino which held off a late push from Barker’s Gulf Porsche to take a hard-fought podium in a class that was shook up by the heavy rainstorm necessitating a dash into the pits to fit wets. The biggest losers in that regard was the #90 TF Sport Aston Martin which started on class pole. Losing time after a spin for Salih Yoluc when he tried to overtake Egidio Perfetti’s Team Project 1 Porsche at Village, the pit strategy of their rivals also factored against them as they crossed the line in seventh - behind the Porsche 911 RSRs of Gulf Racing, Dempsey-Proton Racing and the aforementioned Team Project 1 entry.

    The next round of the World Endurance Championship heads to Asia for the Six Hours of Fuji on October 4, 5 and 6.

  • #8 Toyota leads the way in Silverstone FP3

    The #8 Toyota Gazoo Racing TS050 Hybrid topped the final FIA World Endurance Championship practice session but Rebellion Racing continued to close the gap at the top of LMP1.

    The #8 set its quick lap - a 1min37.014sec - early in the session as the field adapted to the cooler but less windy conditions than those seen yesterday to initially head a Toyota 1-2 with the #7 nipping at its heels. However, as the 60-minute session continued, the #7 - of Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and Jose Maria Lopez - couldn’t find any answer to both the Rebellion R13s jumping ahead and splitting the hybrids. Securing second was the #3 as Loic Duval first moved towards the front, quickly followed by Bruno Senna in the #1 to finish 0.936sec down on the fastest time in the session. Both the Team LNT Ginettas rounded out LMP1 with the #5 leading the #6 despite the former losing a chunk of time inspecting the G60 after a right-rear puncture led to a spectacular spin for Charlie Robertson as he powered through Becketts.

    United Autosports once again took the top spot in LMP2 as Phil Hanson topped the session for the Anglo-American team, meaning each of the team’s three drivers has set a fastest time with Filipe Albuquerque claiming top spot in FP1 and Paul Di Resta fastest in FP2. Hanson unseated Racing Team Nederland from the top of the class and the Dutch squad couldn’t find an answer for United’s quicker pace, with Giedo van der Garde’s best effort almost seven-tenths off the pace. One-tenth behind in third was the Jackie Chan DC Racing Oreca which moved up a place just before the halfway point, pushing the Cool Racing entry down to fourth.

    The #51 AF Corse Ferrari 488 GTE Evo of James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi set the fastest time in GTE Pro which edged out its regular sparring partner - the #91 Porsche GT Team 911 RSR - by less than 0.1sec. The sister Porsche took third, with the second AF Corse entry in fourth. Aston Martin finished fifth and sixth with the #95 heading the #97 after the latter spent a chunk of the session diagnosing a misfire in the Aston Martin Vantage AMR.

    In GTE Am, AF Corse took the top honours with a storming lap that was almost 1.5sec clear of the rest of the field. Nicklas Nielsen’s best lap in the Ferrari put him third overall in the combined GTE field and was more than enough to see off the early threat from David Kolkmann in the #56 Team Project 1 Porsche 911 RSR. The Porsche Carrera Cup Deutschland regular is sitting in for David Heinemeier Hansson as the latter waits with his wife, who is due to give birth this weekend. Third went to the second AF Corse Ferrari with the #88 Dempsey-Proton Racing Porsche four-tenths behind in fourth.

    The only incident of note in the class - apart from a few spins as drivers explored the limits of grip - came five minutes from the end as the #57 Team Project 1 entry ground to a halt coming out of Aintree with Felipe Fraga behind the wheel. It was pushed to safety by the marshals.

  • #8 Toyota secures lights-to-flag victory at Sebring

    The #8 Toyota Gazoo Racing TS050 of Fernando Alonso, Sebastien Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima took a dominant victory in the maiden 1000 Miles of Sebring, despite a late rain storm causing chaos.

    Starting on pole ahead of the sister #7 driven by Jose Maria Lopez, Kamui Kobayashi and Mike Conway, Buemi – who took the first stint – was untroubled at the head of the field as he pulled clear of the competition. Even as day transformed into night, the #8 ran like clockwork over the airfield circuit’s fearsome bumps to open up a comfortable lead over the #7. Its victory was all but assured with just over three hours of the eight-hour race remaining when Lopez clattered over a kerb at turn 15 trying to avoid the TF Sport Aston Martin Vantage. He was called into the pits so the car could be checked over and lost more than four minutes while the Toyota mechanics went to work.

    The #8 had a scare of its own with less than 15 minutes on the clock as Nakajima slithered off the track despite using wet tyres. He only lost a handful of seconds, but it could have been much worse for the race winners, as the Japanese driver only just missed the barriers.

    After the #28 TDS Racing Oreca, with Loic Duval behind the wheel, went straight on into a tyre wall at low-speed, the last 12 minutes of the race was run under the safety car – guaranteeing a fourth win of the season for the #8.

    Brendon Hartley claimed a podium finish on his return to endurance racing as the #11 SMP Racing BR1 survived an early explosive tyre failure to finish third – the team’s second consecutive podium after success in Shanghai. Their cause was helped by a crash for the #1 Rebellion Racing R13 with three hours to go which sent the car to the garage. The #3 Rebellion also had a number of mechanical issues which relegated it to a distant fourth in LMP1. The #17 SMP machine was on course for a good result in the top class, but Egor Orudzhev crashed into the barriers at turn one just before the two-hour mark. The Russian was running third at the time, having pulled clear of the #3 Rebellion in the opening quarter of the race. Also failing to finish was the DragonSpeed BR1, which was pushed into the garage with a mechanical issue with two hours and 40 minutes still on the clock.

    A decisive move on the opening lap of the race proved to be decisive for the #37 Jackie Chan DC Racing crew of David Heinemeier-Hansson, Jordan King and Will Stevens. Passing the sister #38 at turn one on the opening lap, the trio was unchallenged as they took victory in LMP2 by more than 50 seconds. The pole-sitting #38 Jackie Chan DC Racing Oreca endured a frustrating race. The car lost almost an hour in the pits as the team dealt with a gearbox fault in the car and then lost more time after a bizarre issue with the door failing to open on the Oreca at a driver change. It eventually finished 30th, last of the classified runners.

    Finishing second, a familiar position for the team after the three Free Practice sessions, was the Signatech Alpine A470. Despite a clean race for the French team, its crew of Andre Negrao, Nicolas Lapierre and Pierre Thiriet couldn’t match the front running pace of the DC Racing team. Despite disappointment in LMP1, DragonSpeed picked up a podium in LMP2 as the #31 of Anthony Davidson, Pastor Maldonado and Ricardo Gonzalez had enough pace to counteract two unscheduled pitstops to replace the rear-wing twice – once for a failure on the bumps and once after Maldonado swiped the barriers on the exit of turn 17. Despite a herculean effort to get the car from last on the grid to P8, the Racing Team Nederland entry could only manage fifth in class at the chequered flag – behind the Larbre Competition Ligier.

    GTE Pro proved to be the hardest fought category during the race, with almost every entry in the 11-car class enjoying a spell in the lead and half-a-dozen cars often covered by less than three seconds. Despite the back-and-forth between the teams, it was the heavy rain with less than 20 minutes of the race remaining that made the decisive difference. With teams scrambling into the pits to swap their slicks for wets, Gianmaria Bruni – in the #91 Porsche GT Team 911 RSR – jumped the #81 BMW Team MTEK M8 GTE in the pits and with the late safety car to recover the #28 TDS Racing Oreca, the Italian held on to secure the victory.

    The #81 finished second, the best result of the season for Martin Tomczyk, Nicky Catsburg and Alexander Sims, with the #67 Ford Chip Ganassi Racing Team UK Ford GT in third. That car had led for the majority of the opening four hours, but faded as the race went on – that was summed up by a great overtaking move by Bruni to relegate the #67 from the lead, the Porsche driver out-braking Jonathan Bomarito going into the turn seven hairpin. James Calado, Alessandro Pier Guidi and Davide Rigon ensured four manufacturers were represented in the top four as the #51 AF Corse Ferrari 488 GTE Evo finished ahead of the #92 Porsche of Kevin Estre and Michael Christensen. The latter lost time late on as Estre was given a stop & go penalty for rear-ending the #95 Aston Martin Racing Vantage of Darren Turner. The Aston was running in second at the time, but the contact, which sent turner spinning across the grass, dropped the car down the order.

    Dempsey-Proton Racing secured top honours in GTE Am to make it a Porsche clean sweep of the GTE classes as the #77 of Matt Campbell, Christian Ried and Julien Andlauer fought hard to pass the #54 Spirit of Race Ferrari. The Ferrari finished second, despite receiving a penalty for side-to-side contact which sent the Team Project 1 Porsche into the barriers early on in the race. Thankfully for the Project 1 team, the damage proved to only be minor and thanks to a strong charge from Egidio Perfetti, Jorg Bergmeister and Patrick Lindsey, the team recovered to the third step of the podium. Gulf Racing took advantage of a black and orange flag for the TF Sport Aston Martin – after the rear diffuser on the Vantage broke apart on track – to finish fourth. The TF Sport car crossed the line sixth after hasty repairs – behind the MR Racing Ferrari.

  • #8 Toyota wins the opening race of the Super Season

    Fernando Alonso, Sebastien Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima won the first race of the World Endurance Championship super-season at Spa, despite a stunning comeback by their sister Toyota after a pit lane start following a qualifying infringement.

    Short Image Description

    The #8 Toyota TS050 triumphed after the #7 machine of Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and Jose Maria Lopez was excluded from qualifying having taken pole for an incorrect declaration of the fuel flow meter. It therefore started from the pit-lane a lap after the rest. A series of incidents got the #7 onto the leading Toyota’s tail. At mid-distance the #8 lost a minute when Nakajima had to return to the pits a lap after taking over from Alonso as his seatbelts were not done up correctly. Shortly afterwards Nakajima lost another 10 seconds by spinning at La Source.

    Short Image Description

    This left Kobayashi under a minute behind the leader. He had earlier got his car back onto the lead lap and soon after the #8 car’s dramas passed the Rebellion pair to claim second place. Then a safety car period with an hour to go after a heavy crash for Matevos Isaakyan in the #17 SMP Racing BR1-Gibson at Eau Rouge reduced the gap between the Toyotas to just 6s. Alonso driving the final stint kept his head however to hold off Conway by just 1.4s for the win.

    Short Image Description

    The non-hybrid LMP1 pack was headed by the #1 Rebellion of Neel Jani, Andre Lotterer and Bruno Senna, who took the final podium place despite repeated problems with the car’s data transmitting and being ordered to pit to change its transponder. The other Rebellion of Mathias Beche, Thomas Laurent and Gustavo Menezes finished fourth having run in close company of the #1 for much of the way. The #17 SMP Racing BR1-Gibson of Stephane Sarrazin, Egor Orudzhev and Isaakyan had also battled the Rebellions for the final podium place before Isaakyan’s crash, after starting from the back after not setting a qualifying time due to stopping on track with technical problems.The ByKolles Racing ENSO CLM P1/01 driven by Oliver Webb, Dominik Kraihamer and Tom Dillmann finished fifth followed home by the SMP Racing BR1-Gibson driven by Mikhail Aleshin and Vitaly Petrov to complete the LMP1 finishers.

    Short Image Description

    The G-Drive Racing Oreca 07-Gibson driven Formula E championship leader Jean-Eric Vergne, Andrea Pizzitola and Roman Rusinov were comfortable winners in LMP2, leading home the Jota Sport-run Jackie Chan DC Racing Oreca 07 driven by Ho-Pin Tung, Gabriel Aubry, Stephane Richelmi in second by 20s. The Signatech Alpine Matmut driven by Nicolas Lapierre, Pierre Thiriet and Andre Negrao in their Alpine A470-Gibson completed the LMP2 podium. The Racing Team Nederland Dallara P217-Gibson rose quickly to lead the LMP2 class early on with Giedo van der Garde at the wheel, but then had a lengthy stop in the second hour due to a gearbox problem which cost it 15 laps.

    Short Image Description

    The GTE Pro race was a close battle between the Fords and Porsches, which was won by the Ganassi-run Ford GT driven by Olivier Pla, Stefan Mucke and Billy Johnson. They were chased to the flag by the Porsche 911 RSR driven by Michael Christensen and Kevin Estre, 14s adrift. The Porsche had been delayed at two-thirds’ distance by a stop-go penalty for spinning their wheels when being released from the pits. The Ferrari 488 GTE of Davide Rigon and Sam Bird seized GTE Pro third place at the last, with Rigon elbowing past the #91 Porsche 911 of Richard Lietz at the Bus Stop chicane with a minute to go. The other Ganassi-run Ford GT crashed out an hour into the race when Harry Ticknell had a violent front-on smash in the Eau Rouge barriers, which he walked away from, caused apparently by a failure on the front-left of the car. The accident heralded a lengthy safety car period. Reigning GTE Pro champions James Calado and Alessandro Pier Guidi the#51 Ferrari 488 had ran off the Ford and Porsche pace and their chances ended when Pier Guidi collided with the Team Project 1 when exiting the pits with two hours to go. This meant lengthy repairs.

    Short Image Description

    Reigning champions Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Mathias Lauda took the GTE Am win in their Aston Martin Vantage, with Lamy holding off a late sustained attack from second-placed Euan Hankey in the TF Sport Aston Martin.

  • 2016 24 Hours of Le Mans

    The race that will be forever remembered for the unfortunate technical issues to hit Toyota so close to the end of the race.

    Video Credits: FIA WEC

  • 2016 6 Hours of Bahrain

    Audi win their last race in LMP1 for the forseeable future. Neel Jani, Mark Lieb and Romain Dumas are world champions for Porsche!

    Video Credit: FIA WEC

  • 2016 6 Hours of Circuit of the Americas

    Another victory for the No. 1 Porsche.

    Video Credit: FIA WEC

  • 2016 6 Hours of Fuji

    Toyota win on home turf!

    Video Credit: FIA WEC

  • 2016 6 Hours of Mexico

    Emotional home victory for RGR Sport by Morand in LMP2. Porsche victorious in LMP1.

    Video Credit: FIA WEC

  • 2016 6 Hours of Nürburgring

    The Nürburgring yet again gave us great racing and a large and passionate crowd.

    Video Credit: FIA WEC

  • 2016 6 Hours of Shanghai

    Another thrilling race that saw Porsche crowned as constructors champions.

    Video Credit: FIA WEC

  • 2016 FIA WEC Season Review

    Welcome to our review of the 2016 FIA WEC Championship. Put the kettle on, make a brew, settle down in your favourite chair and enjoy!

    LMP1 Season Review 

    Neel Jani, Marc Lieb and Romain Dumas took the FIA World Endurance Championship crown for the first time with a fifth place finish in the 6 Hours of Bahrain, however this season was by no means easy on the crew. They took the first win of the season at Silverstone after the #7 Audi crew were disqualified, second place at Spa Francorchamps in round 2 before taking a last minute win at Le Mans after Toyota heart break in the dying minutes. With double points at Le Mans, the #2 car held a substantial lead at the mid point, 94 points out of 103 on offer saw them sitting at the top of the championship with a 39 point lead. Le Mans was the turning point for the #2 car, early promising performances were replaced with recurring technical issues, reportedly with the cars hybrid system and a distinct lack of pace. Jani, Lieb and Dumas failed to see the podium again this year. Despite these issues, going in to Bahrain, talking to Neel Jani before the start of the race, he was confident the team had what it took to take the title.

    This fall in pace surely held the door wide open though for the ever consistent Audi team to close the gap and take the lead at some point before the season was out? This season however’ Porsche got lucky. A string of issues for Audi meant they were unable to capitalise on the #2 crew’s bad luck in the second half of the year.

    The #8 Audi crew of Oli Jarvis, Lucas di Grassi and Loic Duval were Audi’s main title hopes this year. They were on the pace and working well together, claiming two victories this season in Spa and Bahrain. Uncharacteristically, Audi were hit with a string of issues this year and as a result, both cars arrived in Bahrain out of the championship. Their pace in Austin was phenomenal but hybrid issues for the #8 and a badly timed safety car took both cars out of contention and gifted the win to the #1 Porsche of Webber Bernhard and Hartley. Mexico was yet another poor race for Audi. The #8 was out in front when Jarvis went off at turn one in tricky conditions. Lotterer then hit the wall during a lock up. Porsche came through to take another solid points hall towards both the teams and drivers championship challenge. Another difficult run to fifth in Shanghai for the #8 further dented their title challenge.

    Toyota came in to 2016 with a brand new car, the TS050. The car was a big improvement on the 2015 TS040, the car was competitive and even took the win on home soil in Fuji. As we headed out to Bahrain, Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and Stephane Sarrazin were the only 3 drivers capable of challenging the #2 Porsche for the drivers title. Toyota had more than their fair share of difficulty this year though. They were leading the race at Spa before the #5 car broke down and leading the race at Le Mans before heartbreak on the final lap.

    LMP2 Season Review

    The 2016 LMP2 season was dominated by the #36 Signatech Alpine, adding the FIA WEC to their 2014 European Le Mans Series crown. Nicolas Lapierre, Gustavo Menezes and Stephane Richelmi won half the races in 2016 in the Nissan powered Alpine A460 and never once finished outside the top four. They fought hard with the #43 RGR Sport and #26 G-Drive racing cars throughout the season with Strakka and Manor mounting outside challenges in what was arguably the most competitive class of the season. The LMP2 grid was heavily involved in the FIA driver rating changes this year, a number of teams, including the #36 Signatech, found themselves benefitting from "Super Silver" drivers, drivers classified silver but professional drivers rather than amateur racers. Gustavo Menezes was one of those "Super Silvers" who found himself lapping inside the top 10% of the field on a frequent basis. However, it was a dominant performance from the crew and drivers which saw them take the title.

    Silverstone was the season anomaly for the #36 squad with all three drivers complaining of tire ware issues, they took fourth place and their joint worst result of the season. It was one of only two times they would finish off the podium. Their absence from the podium was filled by the newly formed RGR Sport team running the #43 car with Bruno Senna, Filipe Albuquerque and Ricardo Gonzalez who took their maiden victory. One of the standout events of the season however was Spa Francorchamps. Nico Lapierre made a last minute move to pass Pipo Derani around the outside. The Tequila Patron ESM got caught up behind Marino Franchitti’s Ford GT.

    The #36 car quickly found themselves back on the top step of the podium next time out at Le Mans, an incredible performance from the team considering Richelmi and Menezes were in their debut Le Mans and Menezes, who at 21 years old, had never completed a 24 hour race before. All three drivers put in a remarkable performance, Menezes especially who pulled out a quadruple stint in the early hours of Sunday morning to keep the car in site of the podium. A strong drive from Nico Lapierre, who had taken victory just one year before helped the team take the flag.

    A third straight win for the crew at the Nurburgring, round 4 in July, continued to build their lead. RGR Sport took victory in Mexico with a fitting win, driver Ricardo Gonzales the official promoter of the event took the top step of the podium on home soil. Alpine returned to the top of the podium at the Circuit of the Americas with three races left to run. The team took the title in Shanghai finishing second, wrapping up the title with one race to spare, they were never really under threat.

    G-Drive put on a strong showing in the final three races of the season, taking  a hat trick of wins for Roman Rusinov and Alex Brundle. They were joined for two of those wins by former Manor F1 driver Will Stevens, with Rene Rast stepping back on board for the final outing in Bahrain. Rusinov had trouble in Mexico which cost the team the win with a catastrophic brake failure in the final hour. Despite the team coming from the back of the grid to take the win, RGR managed to secure second place in the championship.

    GTE-Pro Season Review

    Aston Martin Racing headed in to the 2016 FIA World Endurance with a heavily upgraded Vantage GTE. They were up against the new Ferrari 488GTE and the new Ford GT run by Ford Chip Ganassi Racing UK. Porsche opted to take a year out to focus on the 2017 car, however, Dempsey-Proton Racing ran a customer team Porsche.

    Aston Martin’s Nicki Thiim and Marco Sorensen proved themselves more than capable of the challenge, taking the drivers championship in Bahrain with a win in the #95 car. The teams championship however, went to Ferrari, marking a successful first year for the new 488 GTE. The 488 had some big boots to fill. Ferrari own the 2012, 2013 and 2014 GT Manufacturers title with the hugely successful 458 and two drivers titles in 2013 and 2014. The 458 also won Le Mans in 2012 and 2014. No >pressure then.

    Aston Martin stalwart Darren Turner began alongside them at the start of the season, the trio claiming a podium at Silverstone behind the AF Corse Ferraris which dominated the race. Sam Bird and Davide Rigon dominated the race in the #71 Ferrari ahead of Gimi Bruni and James Calado in the #51 which also had to serve a three minute time penalty for an engine change between qualifying and the race. It should be noted, that Bruni set the quickest ever GTE time around Silverstone this year, the first driver to break the 1:59 barrier, going 2.5 seconds quicker than his previous record.

    Disaster struck for the team at Spa, Nicki Thiim was spun in to the barriers by an LMP2 car and came to a rest on his roof at Courbe Paul Frere.

    Ferrari capitalised, however a late engine failure for Calado stripped Ferrari of the projected 1-2 finish they were after. The charge came to a stop at Le Mans though with severe mechanical difficulties. Fourth for the GTE-AM AF Course however gifted the team 24 points, a valuable contribution to the teams title chances.

    Despite not making the podium at Le Mans, the trio took points as the second placed WEC entered car. Both the #51 and #71 cars failed to finish and Aston Martin took the championship lead. Ford put on an incredibly dominant performance at Le Mans which saw them bring home three cars in the top four. The #82 Ferrari of Fisichella, Vilander and Malucelli spoiling a Ford front three lock out with a second place. This dominance would see a BOP adjustment later in the season.

    After Le Mans, Aston Martin had a reshuffle of their driver line up which saw Turner swap to the #97 car. Thiim and Sorensen took third place behind the dominant Ferraris before taking third place in Mexico. Turner and Stanaway took the first AMR win of the season in Mexico which put Turner in to the championship lead. Thiim and Sorensen finally took their first win in Austin at the Circuit of the Americas which put them at the top of the table with three races to run and a 12 point lead. Fords dominance returned for Shanghai and Fuji, taking 1-2 finished in both races ahead of #51 Ferrari of Gimi Bruni and James Calado. Heading in to the final race of the season, AMR had a 12 point lead. Turner and Adam set identical qualifying laps to take pole in the #97 before the #95 took the race and a second win of the season.

    Bruni and Calado lost vital points this season and despite finishing on the podium in every race they finished, including a win at the ‘Ring, DNF’s at Spa and Le Mans took them out of contention for the title. They did however, finish third ahead of both the Fords who finished half a point apart, Muecke, and Pla having the slight advantage over Tincknell and Priaulx. Ford took two victories this year and max points at Le Mans enroute to third in their first season back in endurance racing. Three cars in the top four at Le Mans meant they scored max points, whilst two second places at Fuji and Shanghai meant the #66 bested the #67.

    GTE-AM Season Review

    The stats show that the #83 AF Corse Ferrari 458 was not the quickest car in class. They took one win this season but finished every race and claimed 50 points at Le Mans. They took six second place finishes, only failing to take the podium in Austin. The #98 Aston Martin Vantage was notably quicker. The car with Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Mathias Lauda at the wheel took six pole positions including the final race in Bahrain, and five wins. Unfortunately, they took hard knocks at Le Mans and Mexico,not finishing either race. Pole position under the night sky of Bahrain gave them hope.That margin of hope however was incredibly small. Collard, Aguas and Perodo just needed to finish, they crossed the line third whilst the engine failed on the #98.

    The #88 Abu Dhabi Proton took victory on the WEC’s first visit to Mexico and again in Bahrain. The retirement of the #95 gave second in the championship to Al Qubaisi and Heinemeier Hansson. With Klaus Bachler replaced by Patrick Long at Le Mans, Al Qubaisi and Heinemeier-Hansson again came close to beating the Ferrari for the top WEC-registered team, but a late charge from Collard saw the Frenchman take second spot in the final hour, which resulted in a decisive 14-point swing.

    The Porsche crew came on form in the final race, Pat Long put pressure on Lauda which saw the #95 spin, Long then lead the rest of the way fending off Wolf Henzler in the KCMG Porsche. The #78 took their fifth consecutive podium in Bahrain but after technical infringement at Nurburgring and technical failure at Silverstone, they were out of the running. Gulf Racing had a solid performance across the year with some big improvements seen across the season for Ben Barker, Adam Carroll and Mike Wainwright.

  • 2016 WEC 6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps

    Another great race at Spa...and, yet again, fantastic weather!

    Video Credits: FIA WEC

  • 2017 FIA WEC Fan Survey Results

    In September, the World Endurance Championship banded together with Motorsport Network and Nielsen to put together and extensive fan survey. As the WEC has gone through some changes over the past couple of years and looks to be having even more of a revamp from next year onwards (with things like the winter ‘super season’ and LMP1 being more focused on privateers than manufacturers), it was necessary for the WEC to see how fans felt about the sport to increase their engagement, not decrease it. Today, the WEC have released the results of the survey, promising they will take every aspect into consideration when making decisions about the series going forwards.

    WEC had responses from 179 countries across the world, with approximately 54,500 surveys being completed. They took a sample of about 37,200 surveys to produce the results that will be presented below. It rates as the largest survey to have ever been conducted among sportscar fans.

    It was discovered that the WEC has a well-established fan base, with around 58% of those who took the survey claiming they had watched it for over six years (since before WEC had been inaugurated). The other 42% showed promise of a younger fanbase coming into the sport, with most of those stating they had watched for at least three years. Responses from Europe were most popular, with 65% of the responses coming from the continent. Americas were next, with 20%, leaving 10% to have come from Asia-Pacific and the remaining 5% coming from outside these regions. With a good balance of loyal, long-term fans and newer, younger fans the series appears to have a strong support basis going forwards.

    The majority of WEC fans appeared to be hard core motorsport enthusiasts, on average not having much interest in other sports outside motorsports. The brand health of WEC looks healthy, but a startling 80% of those who participated said that the WEC was not as healthy as it was three years ago. With the demise of LMP1 and the loss of teams over the last few years, this is not a surprising conclusion.

    The fans are happy with WEC, describing it with key attributes of technological, competitive, innovative, exciting and global. The competitive of WEC in comparison to Formula One sees the endurance series come out on top, and in expensiveness the WEC also appears better value for money. So long as WEC can continue to deliver exciting, close racing in state of the art cars, the results of the survey suggest fans will still be happy with the series.

    Official websites and motorsport websites come out as the top source of information, with TV coverage coming in as second best. With younger spectators, it seems that on demand and live streaming videos are more desired, with the WEC YouTube account seeing a 60% rise in usage compared to last year. Fans would prefer to pay nothing for additional content, but are willing to pay up to $25, as revealed by the survey.

    In discussing the spectacle of WEC, is was indicated that fans desire a diverse range of things from the series. The range of classes on the track is very appealing to spectators, whilst the format of the race weekend, input of manufacturers into the sport and race events are the key elements of the WEC that sees fans attracted to the sport. Unsurprisingly, the LMP1 class rated as the most followed category in the series, but the positive that WEC can pull from this is that 80% of fans said they followed GTE classes as well as LMP1. It does mean that the WEC are going to have to make sure LMP1 stays as successful as it has been in the coming seasons, with the new privateers taking more of a focus than the hybrids, as it appears from the survey results to be the most anticipated series of the championship.

    A championship of eight to ten races was concluded to be the ideal length by the fans in this survey. With this season having raced nine races, including Le Mans, it seems the fans are satisfied with how many race events occur in a season. When asked about which circuits are most appealing to fans around the world, the top five circuits were listed as: Le Mans Circuit de la Sarthe, Fuji Speedway, Sebring International Raceway, Silverstone, and Spa-Francorchamps.

    In conclusions, the WEC draws from the results that it is currently in good health. Fans agree that the sport is good and enjoyable to watch, but 90% do also believe that more should be done to entice more spectators. Given the success and the enormous amount of responses to the survey, the WEC wish to conduce another before the start of the 2020/2021 season to see how fans have reacted to the radical changes that are about to come into action. It does seem that the WEC are taking the results seriously, and plan to used the fans comments to make positive steps in the future of the World Endurance Championship.

  • 2017 Le Mans Night Summary

    Disaster struck for Toyota through the night as two of their three cars retired from the race. There were many incidents that kept the night running action-packed and a few shocking events that no one could have predicted. Going into the seventeenth hour of racing, the #1 Porsche leads the field by a competitive eleven laps, with the closest LMP1 car being the sister Porsche down in P10.

    Toyota’s woes started when the #8 was forced into the garage with a hybrid issue. It lost just under two hours in the garage as extensive repairs took place, dropping it right down the order to the last of the running cars.

    But the #8’s reappearance was nearly lost in the shock of seeing the leading #7 Toyota lapping slowly. There had been a safety car period to clear some gravel and debris off the dark track, and once the safety cars had pulled in Kamui Kobayashi got stuck in gear with the Toyota unable to go any faster than 60kph. The Japanese driver tried many power cycles and limping the #7 as far as he could but he could not get any closer to the pits that Porsche Curves. Sheer disappointment was clear as Kobayashi climbed from the car, retiring from the race before the halfway mark.

    That was not the end of the disappointment for Toyota. With the #7 retired and the #8 a long way off the leaders, their hope all felt to the #9. Not even ten minutes after the #7 had retired, the #9 made contact with the #25 CEFC Manor TDS Racing and picked up a rear right puncture. Nicolas Lapierre tried to get the car back to the pits for repairs but the punctured tyre caused a lot of damage to the back of the car and cause the rear to catch on fire. Lapierre, cruelly, got much closer to pit lane than Kobayashi did and was only 200 yards from pit entry when he climbed from the cockpit.

    After having lead most of the first half of the race with a competitive pace, Toyota fell to only having one car on track and it being right at the back of the field. The #25 Manor retired instantaneously as heavy contact with the tyre barrier put a lot of damage on the ORECA 07-Gibson.

    This left #1 Porsche in the lead with an 11 lap gap to the next car on track and a big gap to the next LMP1 car. The #2 crew and the #8 team have been pushing hard through the night to try and get back up the grid into a competitive position and to take as many points home from the weekend as possible. the #2 is currently in 10th whilst the #8 is behind in 15th.

    #38 Jackie Chan DC Racing took over the lead of LMP2 in the hands of Oliver Jarvis on track, using a great strategy and the safety car periods to leap the two Vaillante Rebellions. The Rebellions seem to have lost their edge through the night as little issues and brief visit to the garage have seen them drop further behind the #38, giving the leading LMP2 around a lap advantage.

    A big incident saw the #92 Porsche GT Team join the growing list of retired cars. In the middle of the night, it lost the car at Ford Chicane and made contact with the tyre barrier. Repairs on the barrier and removing the car from the track were the reasons behind the slow zones and yellow flags. Unfortunately, the Porsche could not get running again so it retired behind the barrier at the side of the track.

    Aston Martin had been the team to beat throughout the night, but as the sun has broken across the track the top four positions in class are covered by four different manufacturers. With the weather supposed to hot up for the closing stages of the race, it could go any way for the chequered flag.

    #90 TF Sport and #84 JMW Motorsport have had fantastic performances throughout the race, with the JMW now leading the class with a lap in hand. The #90 had been pushing #84 for the lead but after a scheduled brake change and an unscheduled brief stop out on track the #90 down the order, leaving the #99 Beechdean AMR as the best placed Aston Martin. Ferrari-running teams are currently locking out the top three positions in the Am class.